Now that Donald Trump has Won


#1667

Just setting up someone to appeal to the “see both parties have good and bad” types.


#1668

Flake is retiring. He doesn’t care about looking like much of anything to anyone which is why every interview with him about trump has been “Hey, fuck that guy,” for the past year.


#1669

I’m aware he’s retiring, but what I mean is he agrees with Trump and them on most things. Sure he can say ‘fuck that guy’ in interviews, but when rubber meets the road, they agree on most things. He may wish he was more polite or some such but, when it comes to tax cuts and social issues. They’re on the same side.

My read on him, is that, like most ‘normal’ republicans, flake doesn’t like these allegations against judge rapist (I keep calling him that partly because it’s true and partly because I can’t be asked to learn to spell his name), but, he thinks it’ll be worth having him on the bench for all the other things that they basically agree on, like taxes and deregulation and yadda yadda usual republican talking points.


#1670

Apparently McConnel will go to Trump and the White House to ask for the FBI investigation.

If Trump says no…We will see if Flake has a backbone.


#1671

What the fuck… Oliver Twist voice “Please sir, I want an investigation if you please.”


#1672

#1673

Took long enough.


#1674

Uhhhh…


#1675

What makes me inclined to take Flake fairly seriously is Chris Coons involvement. I’ve met Senator Coons, he’s a newer Senator so he doesn’t have the “Good friend across the aisle”-History that Senator Carper has.


#1676

Dun dun DUNNNNNNNNN…

"The texts between Berchem and Karen Yarasavage, both friends of Kavanaugh, suggest that the nominee was personally talking with former classmates about Ramirez’s story in advance of the New Yorker article that made her allegation public…

The texts also demonstrate that Kavanaugh and Ramirez were more socially connected than previously understood and that Ramirez was uncomfortable around Kavanaugh when they saw each other at a wedding 10 years after they graduated."

More evidence…


#1677

#1678

Remember, the president can’t pardon state crimes…

I wonder what the statute of limitations is for tax crimes in New York State… Nuts, it looks like it’s only about 5 years according to this law firm:

https://leibowiczahroni.com/new-york-state-tax-audits-and-investigations-civil-and-criminal/#5

Still, I guess there must still be some enforcement ability (civil, perhaps) if the criminal statue of limitations has expired and the tax department is looking into it.


#1679

Kavanaugh protesters in DC are being arrested.


#1680

In response to the hate issue:

You’re right. I hate the GOP and those who support them. Deeply. Incandescently.

You have a party that, now, isn’t even attempting to hide racist, sexist, fascist behavior. The entire platform is naked cruelty, disregard for the poor, disregard to minorities, and incitement to violence. A party that has first courted neo-nazis and other malignant groups through coded language, and now openly. A party that is very literally embracing those who would harm me, my family, my friends, physically, mentally, and financially. A party that has happily accepted aid from a foreign, fascist power to steal elections and push propaganda. A party that is made up of the either the most vile creatures or the shockingly stupid.

They hate me. They hated me because of what I am. They’ve threatened people like me.

I’m inclined to believe someone when they threaten a group that I belong to, and I intend act accordingly.

So, yes. Hate is an accurate term. There are no good Republicans. No thoughtful moderates. Just a cadre of avaricious, power hungry, conniving con-men willing to sacrifice anyone and everyone else for their own gain, and the people who support them hoping to get in on the game either by feeling entitled to bring cruel or deluded enough to think they’ll get into the same position.


#1681

In regards to how the Republicans have for years acted in bad faith and Democrats have compromised and hoped that by following the rules & norms they would win over voters or at least be respected; but all that has resulted is that the Republicans have gained leverage and frustrated Democrats’ initiatives.

One question that I can’t come up with a decent, or really any, answer to is: from a game theory point of view what radical maneuvers could the Democrats make over the next 2-6 years that would either/both achieve their policy goals or frustrate and limit the Republican power plays that have entrenched their political position with a minority of the country truly supporting their goals?

What I am thinking with this is not responses to specific issues - Kavanaugh nomination, Senate filibuster, playing as politically dirty as the Republicans have done (by dirty, I mean literally railing against a principle when it suits them and then barefacedly adopting or ignoring it when they are passing a law or supporting a candidate). I mean what could the Dems do that the Repubs wouldn’t even realize how clever it was and aren’t prepared to torpedo with procedural maneuvers and talk show rhetoric? Something that most people wouldn’t even realize the significance of until months or years later.

Come on game theorists, the left needs non-reactive clever thinking!


#1682

There needs to be some care in pulling any of this off. Anything the Democrats do, the Republicans are likely to escalate, so care needs to be made to ensure that should Congress flip, the Democrats don’t set things up for the Republicans to later take advantage of.

The Senate GOP, for all their dirty play, has at least shown there are some limits they won’t cross, at least for now. The best example is that they haven’t killed the filibuster for general legislation yet, despite Trump’s calls to do so. This hearkens back to Harry Reid eliminating the filibuster for non-Supreme Court judicial nominees. I don’t think McConnell would have eliminated it for the Supreme Court if Reid hadn’t already established that precedent. Instead we probably would’ve had some sort of compromise similar to what happened during the George W. Bush administration when they last brought up the so-called “nuclear option.”

McConnell seems to like to throw Democratic moves back into their faces with metaphorical mustard than to outright blow up the Senate to suit his agenda, or at least that has been his pattern so far. He even used the so-called “Biden rule” to justify what he did to Merrick Garland. Now, he also claimed he would’ve continued to block any SC nominees if Hillary Clinton had won, but given how that didn’t happen we don’t know for sure if that was actually his intent or just political bluster.

Of course, I am not a game theorist, but there is a lot of subtlety going on here that can’t be ignored if you’re trying to come up with a valid strategy.


#1683

All fair points. Though I’m not convinced that McConnell only removed the filibuster for SC because of Reid’s action, that was just the convenient excuse. But this illustrates my point and question, why do liberals have to be constantly outmaneuvered by lying conservatives? Why do only the Republican lawmakers get to look “clever” by gaming the system?

I’m not necessarily expecting making rules changes to change the game. At the high end (difficult to do, will require Democratic majorities plus a new president) new laws passed. At the grass roots level I’m looking for things like forcing Republican politicians to own their shit and not be able to dodge responsibility and blame as well as running clever political campaigns to get more Democrats into power at all levels. As rational people wait for Republicans to get embarrassed at their bald-faced lies and contradictions with their own previous positions, the heat death of the universe will come first. So, how do we force them into taking responsibility - meaning the voters hold them accountable? It won’t happen just because they feel bad.


#1684

I am beginning to think that to fight bad faith political maneuvering there are few options. One, stooping to their level for the greater good, waiting for a huge societal shift, or violence. The latter two too often go hand in hand often caused by the first. I think there is going to be another civil war in the nearish future and I’m pretty sure at this point the fascists will win because much of the modern left doesn’t have the spine or guts to see it through. I’ve pretty much lost all hope.


#1685

There it is, the end of our democracy because of a faux Democrat and Collins’ usual shenanigans.


#1686

I suspect the best Democratic end-game for the current era of American politics may be securing statehood for Puerto Rico. If that were to happen, the added congressional seats and electoral votes would pretty much guarantee Democratic control of the legislative and executive branches for a long time.

Forcing in their (lifetime) judicial appointments by whatever means is probably viewed by Republican politicians as a critical damper against that eventuality. Those appointments won’t prevent long-term Democratic control, but would serve both to hamper things from getting too crazy after the Democratic rise and to pro-actively degrade progress by moving the starting line backwards as much as possible in the meantime.

On the other hand, this Kavanaugh appointment is now sufficiently mired in doubt and controversy that a flipped congress might actually be able to remove him pretty easily in a much shorter time frame.