Things of Your Day


#2886

Brazilian Rom Hacks are the best and the worst.


#2887

#2888

I guess Macaulay Culkin figured out he could reenter the public eye by just getting on every Youtube channel possible.


#2889

If you got enough money you don’t need to work, there are a lot worse things you could spend your time doing. A lot better than assholes who compete to see who can buy the biggest yacht or fanciest car.


#2890

Modern Rouge! I am a fan of their show and highly recommend it if you like to learn about random things. Here are a few episodes I can recommend to give you an idea on how the show is.


#2891

yeah I just discovered them and I really dig their honest excitement for the shit they do, feels a lot more authentic than a majority of the professional youtubers


#2892

#2893

#2894

Don’t forget to check out Brian’s other show he did with Jason, Hacking the System, which is basically a proto-Modern Rogue (IIRC, he started Modern Rogue after HtS got turned down for a second season).


#2895

This is a somewhat tenuous connection, but my friend’s ex-husband’s father died and his obituary went viral:

https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/timesunion-albany/obituary.aspx?n=geoffrey-l-turner&pid=191568089

"Sarah Huiest knew that her father had made preparations for his death, including writing his obituary — a way, she said, for the 66-year-old to tell his own story in his own words…

“I was an idiot who made the same stupid decision, day-after-day, multiple times per day. I was a smoker and even though I knew it may eventually kill me, I chose to deny the truth to myself. The pain and suffering I caused my family was not worth the perceived ‘satisfaction’ that really did nothing more than waste money, separate me from my family, and eventually destroyed my body.”

Turner, who worked in the computer business, wrote that during his life, “I did many good things, helped lots of people, and even made a decent living."

“At 66 years old, I lived a decent life, but there are so many events and milestones I will not be able to share with my loved ones,” he continued. “The moral of this story — don’t be an idiot. If you’re a smoker — quit — now — your life depends on it and those that you love depend upon your life."

He listed his survivors — his wife, his children, his grandchildren and his brother, who he said was “five and a half years older than I am, and even though I never stood a chance, we competed at everything.”

Then he gave them a message, a mantra to live by: “Remember, life is good — don’t let it go up in smoke.”


#2896

Two guys trek 30km across the steppe to sneak into the abandoned hangers of Baikonur Cosmodrome the night before a Soyuz launch:


#2897

A super cut trailer of all the movies. I got some feels watching this.


#2898

#2899

#2900

I don’t really like giving red meat to the lions but that’s what my totd is:

Who’d have thought you could fucking solve the homelessness problem by just giving people stable housing?

What about confounding factors like mental illness and drug abuse etc.? Good question. All of those become easier and cheaper to treat when stable housing is a guarantee. FFS


#2901

This is definitely a great solution, but housing is way cheaper in New Orleans than say, NYC. I don’t know if the solution would be feasible here from a financial perspective.


#2902

NYC is the exception though. This, basically unmodified would work almost everywhere.

That said, I agree. NYC faces some additional challenges.


#2903

If you think there isn’t unused area in new york that could be converted into housing for the homeless, you don’t know your city that well. Hell, just last year, there was 250,000 and change apartments in New York that sat vacant, no tenants. As of last year, there were 63,000 and change homeless people.

Sure, it’ll be pricey, but if you feel that leaving people sleeping on the street is preferable because it would cost a lot of money - money that New York does have - then I’ll accept that excuse. Right along with any claim to being the “Greatest city in the world”, because if that’s the case, New York doesn’t deserve it.


#2904

Those vacant apartments are mostly Pied a Terres that rich people bought but don’t use. The cost of renting enough of them to house 63,000 people would be insane.


#2905

I wonder how hard it is to get Section 8 housing assistance in New York (and would it help get some tenants into those apartments)?

I have multiple small-time landlords in my family and they all are perfectly happy to accept tenants who are on Section 8. They view it as a win-win: they are guaranteed some income for their rental properties and tenants who otherwise would not be able to afford housing get a place to live. Granted, these are pretty basic apartments in not exactly the ritziest of areas (Fall River and New Bedford, Massachusetts, mostly), but they’re pretty reasonable and certainly better than living on the street by a million miles.