Photos


#21

Yes, I am also working on that as well. Switching to JPG let me get the photos uploaded the same day I took them. I also learned a lot of Lightroom shortcuts and such.


#22

You’re not using the right metaphor here. It’s not like you are using different tools to get to the same place, just a different skill with the same tool. It’s the same tool with the same software and the same hardware and the same process and the same cables and everything.

The better metaphor would be someone who has learned to draw a face using a pencil with just a single line for each feature, and they’ve built up the skill over time to be able to make every face picture look good and in proportion and expressive and everything.

But you are happy with using a pencil to draw a face with loads and loads of lines per feature, and lots of going over the same lines time and time again. And then using an eraser over and over, and going back to draw the lines again, with more and more weight per line, eventually ending up with… a face that might be as good and in proportion and expressive as the expert artist. But probably isn’t.

Turn off burst mode. Frame a shot, take a single photo for insurance, and then WAIT. Wait until the scene comes together in the frame, and take the photo at the exact moment. It will take practice, but once you get used to it, you’ll not have to constantly check the camera screen, nor wait for photos to clear out the buffer, nor fill up the SD card with jpgs or even RAW files, nor have loads of duplicate photos to transfer, nor dozens of photos to look through per shot.

It’s just better. It’s what better photographers do. Dare to become better.


#23

[quote=“lukeburrage, post:22, topic:1050”]
Turn off burst mode. Frame a shot, take a single photo for insurance, and then WAIT. Wait until the scene comes together in the frame, and take the photo at the exact moment. It will take practice, but once you get used to it, you’ll not have to constantly check the camera screen, nor wait for photos to clear out the buffer, nor fill up the SD card with jpgs or even RAW files, nor have loads of duplicate photos to transfer, nor dozens of photos to look through per shot.
[/quote]I never look at the screen on the back of the camera. I’m even at the point where the auto-review pisses me off, and I have to disable it. After shooting film so much, I definitely have no need for that.

But like I said, even if I try that, I’ll probably miss because of reaction time, autofocus time, etc. I can actually change the setting on the camera to take a photo immediately when I press the button, instead of waiting for autofocus, but when I tried that, focus was way off all the time.


#24

I’m pretty sure there will be a half-press function on the shutter. Hold it down half way and the autofocus will kick in. It’ll keep focusing as long as you hold it half way. As soon as you want the photo, click in all the way. It’ll take a photo immediately and in focus.

Here you go:


#25

Yes, that is obvious, but it’s really bad at following the subject if it moves between the time you half-press and full press. It’s great if they stay at the same distance, though.


#26

There will be a setting to switch that around then. So it will constantly keep focusing with the half press. Look at the custom settings.


#27

There is such a setting. I’m saying that it is not very good!


#28

But it must be using some kind of continuous focus to get the middle photo in a series of photos in sharp focus. The same focus must be available when it also isn’t taking photos!


#29

The photos are in focus when it’s in burst mode because I have it set to only fire the shutter if focus has already been obtained. You can notice it will often delay the next shot when it loses focus and has to get it again. If something is moving fast, and you try to capture one precise moment with one shot, you need to hope the subject doesn’t move out of focus between the half press and the full press. Alternatively, manual focus. Alternatively, trust the camera and hope it isn’t slow that time.


#30

Okay. I guess you are just trying to do action and sports photography with a tool that isn’t close to being good enough then.


#31

It’s good enough for me, just not good enough for pros. Luckily, I’m not a pro. Even though it is not the king of sports photography, it is great in other ways.

I already own it, for one. That’s a huge value proposition. Also, it is the king of video that I use it for more often than sports photography. Most of all, it is small. Even if someone gave me a free Nikon D500, I couldn’t possibly carry that around the city while biking. With a micro 4/3 camera, I can carry the camera, plus three zoom lenses that are the equivalent of 24-70 2.8, 70-200 2.8, and 200-800 4.0-6.3, plus batteries. Even if I don’t use them all, they all fit in my bag with no significant weight, so I may as well. It’s actually been quite handy since I’ve come across sports I can get very close to like bocce as well as sports I have to stay really really far away from, like Cricket. The Nikon 200-800 alone is as big as a telescope and requires a car to move around.

Also, what it lacks in autofocus it makes up for in other areas. Like oh, shooting at 9 or 12 fps. Or 30 or 60fps 6k photo mode. You know, stuff like that.


#32

I’m not trying to convince you to change cameras, just commiserating that you don’t have the appropriate tool for the project you are working on.


#33

It’s just fine. It just doesn’t work the way you want it to.


#34

I think it’s an inflection point. Most people want to buy a camera that isn’t way too expensive for both their skill level and their use cases. It’s always better to buy a cheaper camera and learn how to use it and then you know what you need from a bigger or better camera.

Most people never improve their skills enough to make the step to the better camera. Which is good, because iPhone cameras are good enough for most situations.

You’re one of the rare people who have now surpassed the capabilities of your camera, and it is holding you back from being a better photographer.


#35

I have definitely not surpassed this camera. The only camera I have surpassed is that first micro 4/3 camera I got, the GF2. There were photos I wanted to take, such as lightning photos, and it was literally incapable of doing so. I got that camera in 2011, not long ago, and the specs already look way sad. Cameras have come a lot further in recent years than it seems.

I replaced it with the GH4 in 2014, and I didn’t actually surpass that camera. The HDMI port just broke, which I need for streaming. So I got the GH5 and am selling that bad boy on eBay. I definitely haven’t surpassed the GH5. There is no photo I want to take that I have failed to capture because the camera is too limiting.

My film cameras, on the other hand, are starting to feel limiting. The “film is the best, I’m learning so much!” feeling is going away and is being replaced with the “Why can’t I change the ISO, and why can’t I change between color and monochrome?” feeling. That’s why I’m planning to use up most of the film I have and probably get that Fuji to replace them. Then I’ll be able to more easily share my non-sports photos.


#36

When I first got a digital camera, I was taking 500+ pictures, just because…

Then when it came to sharing, realising how much time I was wasting having to filter through the garb, I was like fuck this.

“Take time, to take the shot.”

Now I average about 100~ photos per occasion. Far more manageable. Would be even less with better equipment.

I have a 550d with kit lens. I’m definitely working at it’s limit.

Next purchase order:
Flashgun (Canon Speedlite 600EX II-RT)
Lens (undecided, but preferably a zoom lens)
New Body (70D/ 6D/ 5D)


#37

What a coincidence. There’s a firmware update released TODAY. We’ll see how it works.


#38

Also, for Canons, custom firmware.

http://www.magiclantern.fm/


#39

I looooooove my 70D.


#40

No need for custome firmware on my camera. There are no missing features in the official software.