Gun Control


#21

Not if we make them like Dune and projectile weapons fired at them cause more destruction than not having shields.


#22

Real people are dying. Right now. Let’s focus on that and actual solutions to that, I say.


#23

Trying to take the fun out of my dreams of being one of the 0.0000000000000000125% robot overlord class!


#24

Mandatory registration of all guns
Background and competency checks for all gun ownership and sales
Felony charges for anyone caught with an unregistered weapon
Felony charges for anyone caught selling/transfering a gun without checks/re-registration

These alone would allow sensible states to better prevent and track illegal guns and enforce their own gun laws. We don’t even need to ban them. Just regulate them. That would do a ton of good in a hurry.


#25

The fact that Afghan insurgents held off two superpowers for decades with almost nothing but small arms and Japanese pickup trucks begs to differ. That said I will wholeheartedly agree there needs to be far more strict controls on possession. I’ve expressed this before it is access not objects that need to be controlled. I disagree with your assertion that there should be registration as someone who believes in the human right to rebel against tyrannical governance, and gun registration is counter to that. On all other counts I’m with you. License for purchase and possession with background checks and psychological evaluations that are renewed and reviewed at intervals. Private party transfers require a licensed retailer as a go-between. Felony prosecution on all violations.


#26

That “example” is so far from even the remotest semblance to the situation in the US that it beggars my mind you’ve even raised it.


#27

There’s a difference between Guns and Meth:

The company that make Sudafed doesn’t active lobby and contribute to congress to prevent the regulation of Sudafed. They also don’t use the specter of regulation to push the sale of their product.

If Gun printing become a thing, they still need gunpowder to make the whole system work. Considering that it’s a Hazardous substance you could track that if there was legitimate political will.


#28

A lot of the people behind the shootings are angry while men who have decided to go out an use their guns air their grievances to the world. They already have the guns, or can assemble their collections legally, they just decide to go on a shooting rampage.

I’m not saying regulation wouldn’t slow down future problem, but there are a lot of guns out their in the hands of angry men.

Personally I think ammunition needs to be regulated, but both sides see that as a non-starter.


#29

Shout out to the white people responding on my FB post to the asshole who didn’t listen to me and got his shit twisted.


#30

Idea that will never happen: a significant gun tax that’s used to pay for funeral or medical expenses in addition to lost wages and property damage caused by gun damage, irregardless if it is caused by terrorism, domestic violence, police violence, suicide, etc. The federal government should cover the entirety of these costs, especially if they refuse to do anything about guns.


#31

All I am saying is the power of motivated people to resist an organized conventional foe despite “inferior” capabilities should not be underestimated. The Soviets and the U.S. were defeated by the Afghan and Iraqi insurgencies.


#32

I can tell you, at length, why that wouldn’t work. But that’s not relevant, here’s the short version that’s about what you’re talking about.

The majority of practical concerns aside, you’re missing a few important factors - it’s a home game, at that point. In the middle east, it’s an insurgency being fought against by people who by and large don’t speak the language, know the culture, and stick out like sore thumbs in basically every regard.

In the US, it IS their language, their culture, their backyards. There’s no vanishing away into unfamiliar terrain, because it’s home turf. No hiding among the populace and struggling to find them, because you have the ability to actually talk to people and get information. There’s already structures in place to push back against these sorts of actions, between the police, the FBI, and more recently, the intervention of other alphabet soup agencies.


#33

What the shit?!

Nice to see a country that cares.


#34

I would argue that it would be easier to have an insurgency among people of your own culture. It is easy to hide amongst your own. It’s what insurgents do. The organized military forces would have a terrible time distinguishing friendly or neutral civilians from insurgent fighter. As for being able to talk to people and gather intelligence more easily, while that is true people have a huge propensity to protect their own.


#35

The police, as arms of the state, are unabashedly racist, not just in selective enforcement but in every facet of their work and responsibilities.

Strict enforcement and the promises of strict enforcement are how we got into this mess in the first place. Liberals have promised for 50 years that increased professionalization and stronger enforcement standards would solve the problems conservatives ignored inherent in policing in a racist country. They have been giving cops more education and better training to justify arming them to the teeth. The only thing getting closer to meritocracy has done is made them smarter about lying while simultaneously shielding them from opprobrium because they have been professionalized, utilizing all of the power and privilege professionalism bestows, as if professionals are somehow less racist than non-professionals.

Insisting on harsher sentencing is problematic as well. Even if the proportions could be made more equal in regards to race, under the current system that would simply mean incarcerating more white people, adding to the overburdening of the legal system in housing prisoners. California, where I live, blue state that it is, has so many prisoners that actively housing them in state facilities is so expensive and violates their human rights so much that they have taken to throwing prisoners into inadequate county jail facilities, which weren’t built to handle so many of them and also probably violate their human rights. Honestly, from the pictures I have seen, it is hard to see how different some of them are from Arpaio’s county camps. That is the system people want to use to solve gun issues. The money we spend on prosecuting people and housing them on a semipermanent basis already steals so many resources from the rest of society and the only things people can think of are to feed the beast some more.


#36

And easy to find someone among your own, too. That’s what I’m saying - it becomes a lot easier to find someone without those obstacles.

To put it another way, say I’m hiding from you. I’m not wearing a disguise, but I blend in relatively well. You have to find me in your hometown, by whatever means you wish, and I have relatively little resources compared to you. Not that hard, right? You know the land, you know people, so on, you have resources you can tap.

Now try and find me in my hometown, AND you can’t talk to anyone(not knowing the language), AND you’re not allowed to have a map or get directions, and don’t know where anything is(unfamiliar territory), AND I’ve got no such restrictions along with my local resources(home turf advantage), it becomes a much harder job. Not impossible, but much harder.


#37

I feel like the only reason an “insurrection” in the US might not get blown up in a matter of minutes is a strong desire to not shoot at other (white) Americans.

Any reasonable solution to gun control is going to probably be slow enough that people will claim it failed before it can have much effect and we can’t even get to the point of talking about it politically.

As far as regulating 3D printed or CNC’ed guns the process is actually pretty simple. It’s already pretty easy to make a decent gun if you have some engineering / machining ability and it hasn’t been a big issue, so the real concern is people downloading files and making it “easy” to do. It would be handled similarly to how we currently deal with some other specific illegal files, which is imperfect but would probably work fairly well in this case based on my limited experience.


#38

I will say that I am not sure whether to classify Paddock as a terrorist myself, at least not yet. Whether a person is just a nutcase or a terrorist is a matter of their motive. Paddock’s motive for now are unknown. This is not a matter of his skin color. Plenty of fucked up white terrorists out there, particularly in the last decade with people like Anders Breivik, Dylan Roof, James Holmes, Scott Roeder, and James Fields being easy examples. It’s just that we don’t know what Paddock wanted to accomplish or why he committed this atrocity.

What definitely IS horrifyingly wrong, unbelievably racist and absolutely unconscionable is how the media is reporting on Paddock’s background in a very sympathetic light, including a link that Rym put in the OP. Meanwhile black victim’s of police violence are almost always portrayed as “thugs” or “got it coming” even if they were completely innocent of the situation, e.g. Tamir Rice.

To be fair, this could be the result of many different things. One example could be investors expecting a run on guns by people who fear new legislation making their acquisition harder in the wake of the events of Las Vegas.


#39

#40

Lol yeah what possible fact would come up that would change the statement? MAYBE if he was mind controlled by aliens