Formula 1


#41

If you asked me who I expected to see doing a shoey, Patrick Stewart was honestly pretty low down the list.


#42

#43

Everyone will be used to the halo in about three races, and then in five years time we’ll look back and wonder how anyone was crazy enough to go so fast in single seater cars without them.


#44

See also: hockey helmets.

Could they totally encase the driver in a bubble canopy, fighter-jet style?


#45

I don’t think even Kevin here is saying they don’t improve safety. It’s just nice to hear someone saying what they truly believe so bluntly at a press conference instead of speaking carefully and politically.


#46

I saw a discussion about this on Facebook a couple of weeks ago. Some mug was saying that they wanted more danger and that the drivers know the risks so why sugar coat it. I mean who wants to make it safe eh?


#47

[quote=“Amp, post:46, topic:384”]
Some mug was saying that they wanted more danger and that the drivers know the risks so why sugar coat it.
[/quote]I have seen basically that same argument all over.

Only gladiatorial bloodsport will sooth their damaged souls. Consign them to consume MEAT.


#48

The irony that always tickles me is that the people arguing for more violent sports are the people who never take any risks of it. I mean hell I got grief in rugby for wearing a scrum cap. From someone who never played the dam game. Its almost like these people don’t understand the consequences.

But yeah, consign them to MEAT…and no more talk of the book that I haven’t read yet :stuck_out_tongue:


#49

In endurance racing/sports car racing like the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the fastest Prototype style cars are all closed cockpit now, In fact, when I checked the cars starting up for Le Mans, I didn’t see a single open cockpit vehicle.


I don’t care for the halo design they’re using, but all race cars but for Formula style and Indycars, and quite honestly, they’re behind the times. I love the racing produced by the current Indycar chassis, it’s some of the most exciting racing around, but after Justin Wilson died because he was struck with debris from a crash ahead of him, it’s pretty upsetting that the new design doesn’t have a protected cockpit.


#50

Also, F1 cars turned ugly in the mid/early '70s. While there have certainly been better or worse, everything we have today really looks like crap relative to the glory of the cars of the '60s. You got all that aero shit all over the new cars, but now the halo is the first time you gotta complain about looks. If it increased speed by a fraction of a second everyone would install them voluntarily with no complaints.


#51

[quote=“HitmanHart, post:49, topic:384”]
In endurance racing/sports car racing like the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the fastest Prototype style cars are all closed cockpit now, In fact, when I checked the cars starting up for Le Mans, I didn’t see a single open cockpit vehicle.
[/quote]Yeah, it’s pretty much two categories of racing, now - F1, it’s feeder series(like Indy, formula ford, etc), go-carts and niche series(like the absolutely tiny racing leagues for extremely old cars) with open cockpits, and literally everybody else.


#52

If the halo doesn’t take off, I think that in the future, with high speed series (so not carting), the distinction will be between “cockpit” series where the driver is sitting in a person-sized single capsule in the middle of the car and “two seat” series where the driver is sitting on one side of a two-person-width space.

Then the distinctions will be open wheel/closed wheel/silhouette/other body types, not how exposed the driver is.


#53

[quote=“lukeburrage, post:52, topic:384”]
with high speed series (so not carting)
[/quote]Don’t be so sure. One of the bigger series for Go-Karts, particularly at the pro level, is SuperKarts, which are not only capable of pushing over 140mph/230Kph, they pretty regularly hit that speed. British SuperKart championship karts are pretty commonly able to hit 160/260.

Sure, it’s not F1 speeds(which tend to be about a hundred kph higher), but it’s roughly the speeds you’d see from F3 cars, it’s pretty fucking quick. Exciting racing, too - the smaller, lighter carts give more room to pass, maneuver quick, and run shorter tracks meaning that you tend to see a lot of very fast, aggressive racing.


#54

Those “glory days” cars were also death traps. Even the movie Grand Prix acknowledged that they were basically bombs on wheels and that drivers dying during races was a regular part of the sport. Could we build cars in that old style that would break apart in a crash to disapate the force of a crash? Perhaps, but the risk of a driver being struck with debris would be too great. I like seeing them at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, but I’m glad we’ve moved on from that design.


#55

#56

F1 has a new logo.

Some people like it, but IMHO it is garbage. The previous F1 logo is one of those great ones like the FedEx logo with the left edge of the 1 perfectly matching the right edge of the F.

The new one is clever in that the F looks like a curve on the racetrack, but that’s all it has going for it. Also it just feels “squat” like it got stuck in the hydraulic press for a bit.


#57

I disagree. I think the new logo is pretty good. If this was the first logo F1 had ever had, I don’t think anyone would be complaining.

I think the old logo is a classic, and love the negative space “1”. But the serif font needed for it looks pretty dated now. I think it dates back to about 1990 or something.

For 1998, the old logo would get a solid 98%, but in 2018, maybe a 70%. The new logo, in 2018, gets an 80%. So the old logo was better for its time, but it is no longer its time.


#58

Downside of the new logo: if you showed me that without saying “F1”, it would take me a long time to figure out what it’s for.


#59

But that is the same for most logos that don’t have the name of the company written in the logo.

What is this?


#60

Rocket paperclip manufacturer.