Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and other American Football issues


#101

Whether or not you are talking about CTE, the fact is that pro wrestlers as a group have a really shitty life expectancy. Those who do manage to stay alive still have some crazy bad health issues. Underwater welding might be safer.


#102

A question: how do life outcomes for pro wrestlers compare to professional stuntmen?

It might partly be a matter of the latter being paid for for fewer stunts.


#103

Yes, there are lots of dangerous jobs, but the frequency at which you partake in the danger is certainly a factor.

Then again, football only plays 16 games a year. It used to be less, but judging by the brains of old timers, that wasn’t much of an improvement.


#104

The concerns about pro wrestler’s deteriorating health and lifespans have actually gotten much better in recent years. The WWE now has a better concussion protocol than the NFL has, and are much more wary about letting wrestlers get back into the ring early (or in some cases, at ALL) if they’ve had a serious concussion or show symptoms of what may be CTE.

Also, a large portion of what caused wrestlers to burn out their bodies so harshly in the past has more to do with how the culture used to be. It was very much like a rock and roll lifestyle, where the wrestlers would always go out drinking and doing drugs, pills, painkillers, etc. after their shows, and while naturally some of that is in response to the pain that they are in after beating themselves up all night, that culture has largely died down in recent years, especially in the WWE.

A lot of the wrestlers have seen what happens when you push yourself too hard for too long in the business, and what happens when you fall into substance abuse, and many of them have gotten smarter about diversifying their talents, getting acting jobs and endorsements and such so that they don’t have to rely on wrestling long after their body has told them it’s time to give it up.

tl;dr: Due to a combination of wrestlers getting smarter thanks to the hindsight of those who have come before, and the abject fear of lawsuits and bad PR that Vince McMahon has, I fully believe there is less risk being a pro wrestler (in WWE) these days vs. being a football player in the NFL.


#105

The wrestlers we most often hear about being tragic and sad in their later years are wrestlers who wrestled for many, many years, often in the range of 15-20 years, but there’s just no way to know. Lou Thesz had a match in his 70s and was by all accounts, perfectly sharp until he passed away. Terry Funk innovated the modern hardcore style of wrestling and took many hard shots to the head, but remains lucid today, even if he is insane to have matches at 73 years old with all the wear and tear on his body. We are seeing wrestlers take better care of themselves now, and the individual promotions are doing right by their wrestlers.

In 1999, Bret Hart suffered a concussion, and then continued to wrestle, suffering more damage to his brain in the process, and he blames that for the stroke he suffered shortly thereafter. Today, if a wrestler suffers a concussion in any of the major promotions, he sits until he can pass some kind of test proving that his brain has sufficiently recovered. Bryan Danielson/Daniel Bryan has been on the shelf for the last few years because he cannot pass a test to Dr. Joseph Maroon’s satisfaction saying that he is healthy.


#106


:frowning:


#107

Also Ice Hockey.

Is the media in Australia writing about CTE in Rugby/Footy?


#108

There are going investigations going on, but not on the scale that football ones seem to be. Rodeos in particular are being looked at. I just listened to a story about someone who was knocked out 30 times in a year (and doesn’t think it’s a big deal).


#109

In the UK a former famous soccer has said his brain should be used for research after he dies.

Research is getting going.


#110

While I feel that hockey has done a much better job than other sports in trying to address this, it still has a long way to go.


#111

Two players have been carted off on a stretcher after hits to the head in this game.

Gruden and McDonough are both just saying over and over “how can these guys keep doing this to each other.”

The first guy put his head down and drilled straight into the ball carrier. Rolled over, grabbing his back, legs not moving.

The second guy got a helmet-to-helmet shot not looking, and the guy that drilled him stood over him and gloated.

In the same drive as the second hit, a player caught a touchdown and took another helmet-to-helmet shot. I can’t believe he got up right away.

I don’t want to link any of those.


#112

Did you see what the gonk did yesterday?


#113

Yeah. :worried:


#114

More context, please?


#115

Gronkowski just hitting a downed player in the spine for no apparent reason other than “I’m mad at you tugging my shirt!”

Apparently he has been suspended for one game for that hit.
.


#116

A fair punishment, given both the severity of the infraction and the fact that he has no prior history of this sort of stuff.


#117

This is a giant development. Sports will need to fundamentally change in reaction to this. The entire world may need to change in reaction to this.


#118

I thought we knew this already? At least I knew this already.


#119

You regularly conflate “knowing” something with “assuming” something.


#120

Or I’m just right all the time.